Best car buffer for 2021 – Roadshow

You’re ready to dive into the world car detailing. Excellent, that means you’re likely looking for the best car buffer or polisher, which anyone from professionals to beginners can grasp without worrying about much at all. These buffing tools are not meant to replace a rotary polisher or rotary buffer, which is for the more experienced professional detailer. Instead, you want to check out a dual-action machine polisher for swirl removal, light scratches and overall paint luster.

With that said, read on to see our top picks for the best car buffer and car polisher. You may be surprised you don’t need to break the bank to pick up car detailing as a hobby and keep your car’s paint gleaming. 

Sean Szymkowski/Roadshow

Yes, there are far more expensive buffing options in the dual-action polisher or random-orbital polisher space, but we enjoyed the Meguiar’s MT300 unit a lot. The construction is properly premium, the adjustable handle makes for a comfier machine than usual and backing plate installation is a breeze.

With a wide range of speeds available, the MT300 was happy applying a bit of car wax, working harder with a polishing compound to remover or anything in between. Meguiar’s credits its digital torque management for smooth operation, and that really came through when working with the unit. The MT300 is quiet and far smoother than other tools we worked with, and when you’re spending this kind of money, it’s exactly what you want. Bonus points for the slow and steady startup speed to ensure you don’t sling car polish product everywhere. These little touches reinforce how premium this car polisher machine feels, while undercutting some of the space’s bigger names.

If there is a con, the power trigger system is a little finicky. We only say that because on a few occasions, it was easy to pinch a finger when squeezing the trigger when starting the buffing machine on a car’s paint surface. Otherwise, it’s hard to find many complaints.

The MT300 typically costs $350, but it’s on sale right now for just $208, which makes it a prime time to buy this lovely dual-action polisher.

Porter Cable

Porter Cable is a well-respected brand when it comes to some excellent budget tools. The company’s 7424XP car polisher isn’t an anomaly in that respect. We really enjoyed the buffing tool’s compact size and optional, attachable handle for this price point from a design standpoint.

The company’s standard foam pad does an OK job with product, but we recommend purchasing your own backing plate so you can swap whatever polishing pad or buffing pad you’d like onto the unit. The tool does not come with another backing plate for this price. However, the 7424XP does its job well when it comes to working in product and taking care of a car’s paintwork. The downside? It’s pretty loud and transfers more vibrations to your hands than our other dual action polisher picks. Nevertheless, if you want an affordable car buffer from a company with a solid tool, Porter Cable is just the ticket. 

Sean Szymkowski/Roadshow

Here’s your step up from Porter Cable. Chemical Guys sells a line of Torq-branded polishers, but if you’re simply looking for an excellent tool to take out swirl marks and light scratches in paint, the TorqX random orbital polisher is an excellent choice.

No, it doesn’t get the fancier digital display like the 10FX model, but the dial movement is totally fine to use while working on a vehicle. It’s comfortable to hold, too, and transfers way fewer vibrations than the Porter Cable unit. We didn’t really care for the on/off switch placement, however. It’s a little clunky to get to while you’re working. In this respect, the Torq 10FX is superior just on this usability factor. That orbital buffer model is also much costlier.

We wanted Chemical Guys’ entry-level unit because I personally use a 10FX at home. After using the standard TorqX, we don’t see why a beginner would need to make the jump to the 10FX. Noise volume is completely tolerable and the random orbital machine works mighty hard with the brand’s Hex Logic pads. Plus, a backing plate is supplied. You’re not stuck with the company’s Hex Logic pads if you don’t care for them, though we personally do recommend them.

The unit starts at $130, but if you do want a complete kit, there are $160 and $190 kits available to stock up on product, pads and more to keep your car paint in top condition. 

Sean Szymkowski/Roadshow

No, this isn’t a tool you’ll use for the entire car, but it’s very handy to have around. With its 3-inch pad, the Milwaukee M12 Variable Speed Polisher was an absolute delight to use for small spaces, hard-to-reach areas and even headlights. Did we mention this unit is cordless? Even better.

Power wasn’t nearly as good with this cordless car polisher as the corded buffing units we tested, but that wasn’t unexpected. You won’t be polishing a whole car with this unit anyway. Really, this little machine comes in handy big time for paint around door handles, body grooves and crevices in a car’s front fascia, and as we mentioned, headlights. Heck, this is a great auto detailing tool for polishing windshields, too.

The biggest downside comes with the variable speed trigger system. While the motor in this cordless polisher spins up to 8,300 rpm, there’s no dial to control this. Instead, you sort have to judge the power as you pull the trigger in. However, the polishing setting locks the tool to a maximum of 2,800 rpm.

The M12 kit comes with one battery pack, a charger, three starter buffing pads and everything necessary to assemble the backing plate and optional handle. It’s a costly tool at $296, but if you can swing it, it’s an excellent addition to a detailing arsenal. 

Zota

Alright, this is a much more affordable option for those in need of a small paint polisher. Zota’s 3-inch orbital polisher isn’t nearly as fancy as our top compact buffing pick, but it gets the job done with plenty of power. Sure, it’s corded, which makes it less flexible, but that’s all right. It’s a great budget-friendly pick that comes with a few accessories for the price, too.

Can you guess what kind of car I worked on with these tools?

Sean Szymkowski/Roadshow

Comparison of the best car buffer for 2021

Brand Name Price
Best car buffer polisher overall Meguiar’s MT300 $207
Best budget car buffer polisher Porter Cable 7424XP $119
Best budget car buffer polisher runner-up SPTA Buffer Polisher $80
Best car buffer polisher for beginners Chemical Guys TorqX $130
Best car buffer polisher for small spaces Milwaukee M12 $295
Best car buffer polisher for small spaces runner-up Zota Orbital Polisher $77

Car polishing tips: How to buff like a pro

  • Take your time: This is the biggest tip we can provide. Polishing takes a lot of time and patience. Don’t expect to knock your car out and be done in 30 minutes. Work in small sections of paint, ensuring each area gets all the time it needs to shine like it should.
  • A little goes a long way: You don’t need to load up a polishing pad with gobs of product. Whether its wax, buffing compound or polish, three or four dots of product is often more than enough.
  • Pick the right polishing pad: There are so many different types of polishing pads on the market. Each of them serve a different purpose. You may want something to finish a car’s paint job off, or something that cuts more for a proper paint correction. Use the right pad with your tool for the job.
  • Wear gloves: While some of our picks transferred more vibrations than others, they all vibrate to a degree. That can be bothersome for your hands, so wear gloves while working with a polisher to minimize the feeling.
  • Understand the limits: Dual-action and random orbit polishers aren’t going to repair your car’s paint after someone keyed it. These tools are best used for swirls, light scratches and paint that’s lost its luster.

Achieve incredible results with these tools

No matter which random orbital polisher unit you choose, they have a Roadshow approval. With our tips, know you’ll be able to wax and polish your car and return amazing results on your beloved car. Happy buffing!

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