Boba Fett Solo Series Has Wrapped Filming and Debuts in December 2021

Temuera Morrison in The Mandalorian

Temuera Morrison in The Mandalorian
Image: Disney+

Temuera Morrison (Aquaman) is cast in the role of Boba Fett and had a recurring role on Disney+ show The Mandalorian. Since then, the first season of Mandalorian spin-off, The Book of Boba Fett has wrapped production.

Advertisement

Gamesradar shared that when Morrison spoke with SFX Magazine, he couldn’t reveal many details about the plot, but he did discuss what it was like filming a show of this scale during Covid. “You walk on set, and you hear, ‘Shields down! Shields down!’ So we have to air those studios out every 20 minutes. It’s called a purge, so you know you’ve got a toilet break then. There’s a lot to shoot in one day, but with health and safety and the requirements, it filters out a lot of the bullshit, put it that way.”

The first hint of a Boba Fett series came during The Mandalorian second season, in which Fett was a large part of the narrative arc. The Book of Boba Fett will debut on Disney+ in December 2021, right before The Mandalorian season three premiere.

The full interview is in the current issue of SFX magazine, which requires a paid subscription.

Are you excited about the show?! I know I am.


For more, make sure you’re following us on our Instagram @io9dotcom.

New Star Wars Toys From Hasbro Turn Baby Yoda Into a Lightsaber, and More

Illustration for article titled New Star Wars Toys From Hasbro Turn Baby Yoda Into a Lightsaber, and More

Image: Hasbro

The stars of Disney+’s Clone Wars sequel series, The Bad Batch, get the Mission Fleet treatment. This means 2.5-inch figures with multiple articulation points for posing, and as you can see, there comes loaded with an arsenal befitting the clone special commando unit. If you pay $19.99 this fall, you can score (from left-to-right) Echo, Wrecker, Crosshair, Hunter, and…huh. Is someone missing, or…

Love, Death and Robots Explains How to Make the Perfect Digital Michael B. Jordan

A digital version of actor Michael B. Jordan as seen on Netflix sci-fi series Love, Death and Robots.

An early version of digital Michael B. Jordan says, “Ahh.”
Screenshot: Netflix

The second season of Netflix’s animated sci-fi anthology Love, Death and Robots contains a short titled “Life Hutch,” starring Michael B. Jordan as a space explorer who gets trapped in the titular Life Hutch along with a malfunctioning maintenance robot that tries to destroy anything that moves. But was that the real Michael B. Jordan or a CG character? The answer is both, and that’s what’s amazing.

Netflix has released this “Inside the Animation” mini-doc about the short, starring Jordan and series creator Alex Beatty, revealing how they digitized the actor—but also utilized him for a few live-action scenes. The process that captured Jordan’s facial animation alone is amazing, as are the results; as the video suggests, I absolutely cannot tell who’s the real Michael B. Jordan and who’s the animated version because they’ve captured his likeness and facial movements so completely. I’ll even go so far as to say that Love, Death and Robots’ CG Michael B. Jordan is superior to Star Wars’ CG versions of Leia and Grand Moff Tarkin in Rogue One and Luke Skywalker in The Mandalorian (although that last one’s a gimme, since he looked terrible).

The series also released a second behind-the-scenes vid, taking a quick look at all the short that comprise Love, Death and Robots’ second season. Since these two videos are labeled Vol. 1 and Vol. 2, it seems a safe guess that more are coming. Will they be more interesting than a picture-perfect CG replica of Michael B. Jordan? Possibly not, but I bet they’ll still be interesting.

Advertisement


For more, make sure you’re following us on our Instagram @io9dotcom.

On Star Wars: The Bad Batch, Maybe Not Everyone Needs an Origin Story

Omega, Echo, Hunter, and Tech look on from a Speeder Bike in a still from Star Wars: The Bad Batch.

Team Bad Batch complete their first mission as mercenaries.
Image: Lucasfilm

Away from the shadow of the Empire, Disney+’s Star Wars: The Bad Batch has found itself in a fascinating place of exploration early on in its run. Stripped of the military world that gave them order in the age of the Republic, our titular heroes and their new ward now have to make a way for themselves outside the rule of law. But even as it treads new ground, the show once again dives into some of Star Wars’ worst habits.

Advertisement

Illustration for article titled On Star Wars: The Bad Batch, Maybe Not Everyone Needs an Origin Story

“Rampage” in ways good and bad feels like a spiritual mirror to last week’s Special Guest Star episode, “Cornered.” The main plot is, once again, simple enough—arriving on the seedy world of Ord Mantell, Omega and the Batch find themselves tasked with trading their services to liberate slaves and get information about the bounty hunter on their tracks. The worldbuilding is, once again, an intriguing exploration of a side of the Star Wars underworld that has been a subject of interest for the Disney era for a good while now. But once again, there is a completely needless shoehorning in of a connection to familiar Star Wars faces that feels even more perfunctory than Fennec Shand showing up last week, but…we’ll get to that.

Thankfully, that connection is not the bulk of the episode, as Fennec was last week, although her shadow lingers across “Rampage.” Tasked by Trandoshan freelancer Cid (Rhea Perlman)—a former Jedi intelligence contact Echo encourages the crew to reach out to—with performing what should be a simple hostage rescue, the episode is an origin story in some ways for the young woman Omega will become. She slowly but surely earns her place not just as the protectee of her clone brethren, but a rightful and capable member of the squad. We see it not just in the comfort she has with the Batch now—including a very adorable low-five with Wrecker—or how she’s slowly picking up her own bits of gear to fight alongside them, from Crosshair’s former comms gauntlet to a weapon we’ve seen her wield in the trailers: an energy bow liberated from the Zygerrian slavers.

Illustration for article titled On Star Wars: The Bad Batch, Maybe Not Everyone Needs an Origin Story

Image: Lucasfilm

But we also see it in the push and pull between Hunter’s desire to keep her out of harm’s way and the necessary realization that sometimes Omega is going to be in that harm’s way, and has to be to help the squad out. Like, say, when things go horribly wrong the minute they start their smash-and-grab at the Zygerrian camp, and all get captured save for her, allowing Omega to show both her independence and her ingenuity to help create a distraction that gives Hunter, Tech, Wrecker, and Echo time to break themselves and the captive slaves free. It’s an important realization, not just for Omega to prove herself as one of the Batch, but for Hunter in particular, that in the dangerous world the squad now lives in, Omega can’t just be put aside out of fear for her safety.

“Rampage” is also, in a way, the start of a new origin for the Bad Batch. Now intrinsically separated from the military machine that forged them in the first place, the squad feels like a set of tools that has been cast aside, and need to find a way to best implement what they know how to do—fight as a unit—in a world where doing so would draw the harsh eye of the Empire’s new masters (and their vengeful former ally). With one element of the underworld already a thorn in their side in the form of Fennec and the Bounty Hunter’s guild, in an uneasy relationship with Cid they find themselves entering another aspect of it: becoming contract mercenaries. It’s a way to make a living, albeit a wary one, considering the heavy-handed threat Cid makes to Hunter at the episode’s end—that in revealing Fennec’s status in the Guild and why they’re being targeted by her, Cid now has leverage over some very useful allies. But it also provides a purpose in a galaxy that has robbed the Batch of the one it was literally made for—and providing that purpose once more through the murky world of mercenaries and bounty hunters will be an interesting avenue to explore as, away from the eyes of the Empire’s tightening grip, they find themselves formed by this new world.

Advertisement

Illustration for article titled On Star Wars: The Bad Batch, Maybe Not Everyone Needs an Origin Story

Image: Lucasfilm

All that is what makes this episode work, where it trips up is the revelation that the target Cid tasks the Batch with liberating from the Zygerrians—a child name Muchi—is a bit more than a humanoid child. It’s a young Rancor, and not just any Rancor: Cid’s client is none other than Jabba the Hutt’s majordomo, Bib Fortuna (Matthew Wood, reprising his fleeting role from The Mandalorian and The Phantom Menace). But Muchi, as cute as it is in the moment, will one day to grow up to be the Hutt’s infamous, sinister pit beast.

Advertisement

Thankfully, the twist that Muchi is not just a Rancor but the Rancor is not the crux of the episode, in the way Fennec was a vital point to hang “Cornered” on last week to its detriment. It’s a similar thing yes, in that Star Wars will frustratingly bend over backward to make connections to its past and make itself feel ever-increasingly insular. But because Muchi’s identity is not the actually important “origin story” of “Rampage”—nothing would’ve changed about the episode if this had been one of the presumably many Rancors that inhabit the galaxy far, far away—this particular indulgence feels significantly less egregious than the show turning Fennec into a primary antagonist and walking The Book of Boba Fett advertisement. It’s still very, very silly though.

Illustration for article titled On Star Wars: The Bad Batch, Maybe Not Everyone Needs an Origin Story

Image: Lucasfilm

Advertisement

But in the end, Star Wars is kind of that in the first place—silly indulgence and earnest character, coming together to make a story that’s at the least workable. And that pretty much sums up “Rampage” to a tee.


For more, make sure you’re following us on our Instagram @io9dotcom.

Advertisement

A Mandalorian Star Arrives to Give Star Wars: The Bad Batch a Few Lessons

Animated Ming-Na Wen plays suited up and masked bounty hunter Fennec Shand in an image from the Bad Batch series.

A familiar face causes trouble for the Bad Batch.
Image: Lucasfilm

The first lesson is that you should never trust a stranger. The second is that sometimes, all Star Wars needs to get by is the help of a face you know from somewhere else in the galaxy far, far away.

Advertisement

undefined

Disney+ and Lucasfilm’s “Cornered,” if not for its special guest star—The Mandalorian’s Ming-Na Wen reprising Fennec Shand—would otherwise be a pretty hum-drum episode of The Bad Batch. After running out of supplies and in need of scrambling their shuttle’s tracking identifier to avoid the Empire, our titular heroes find themselves stopping on the world of Pantora (an unseen but familiar world from the early days of The Clone Wars, mostly known as the homeworld of George Lucas’ blue-skinned Revenge of the Sith cameo, Baron Papanoida). While Tech and Wrecker stay behind to rewire the shuttle’s identifier, Hunter, Echo, and an eager Omega go out to explore the local markets in search of food in exchange for what little Imperial credits they can muster.

Unlike last week, which heavily contrasted the Batch with the long, ever-growing reach of Imperial hegemony through Crosshair’s new squad, the shadow of the Empire has little bearing in the fourth episode. The idea of the Empire’s steady stamp out of individuality through data lingers—not just in the idea of the crew’s shuttle being marked by its transponder code in the first place, but the reminder of chain codes and even currency changes underpinned by local Pantorans cheering on their white-armored new oppressors—but not as a particular commentary. It, like the Empire, is just here now, and a part of the Batch and Omega’s new, weird life.

“Cornered” instead is much more interested in playing with a seedier side of the galaxy far, far away. It’s quickly revealed there’s a bounty on the Batch—turns out, 20-ish years before that infamous utterance, perhaps the Imperials do need their scum—and none other than Fennec Shand, the future ally of Boba Fett in The Mandalorian and the upcoming Book of Boba Fett has come calling. Fennec strikes quickly, leaping on an opportunity to exploit Omega’s childlike innocence when she walks away from Hunter and Echo’s haggling to explore the markets on her own, leading to an intense game of cat and mouse as the crew races to fix and resupply their shuttle on time and avoid the bounty hunter’s deadly ire.

Illustration for article titled A Mandalorian Star Arrives to Give Star Wars: The Bad Batch a Few Lessons

Screenshot: Lucasfilm

What’s perhaps most interesting in the otherwise simple arc of the episode—Fennec nabs Omega, Hunter nabs her back, they flee to fight and run another day—is that Shand is set up less as a one-off threat to the Batch here, and more as a potential ongoing foe. On the one hand, it makes sense to give our heroes an antagonistic force that is less obliquely sinister as the Empire, and they can’t really be going up against Crosshair every week. While there’s an implication that it’s the Empire itself that has put out the bounty on Omega—it could be someone else, perhaps the Kaminoans interested in re-acquiring their most secret of clone assets—even without their direct presence. Fennec as a continued adversary to Omega and the crew sets up the chance for the show to steadily build out what the criminal underworld of Star Wars is really like at this moment of upheaval in the Empire’s rise.

Advertisement

It’s a layer of society it’s been clear Lucasfilm is keen to explore in an ongoing capacity, from Darth Maul’s Crimson Dawn in The Clone Wars and Solo, all the way up to The Mandalorian and now Book of Boba Fett. But the double-edged sword here is a problem that a lot of those other projects have also had to tackle: instead of bringing in a new hunter as a threat for the team, we’re faced with Fennec, a character we admittedly don’t know all that well but one we know, nonetheless. Of course, it makes sense, both textually—Fennec’s been a hunter for a very long time by our first encounter with her in The Mandalorian—and metatextually—Lucasfilm and Disney would like to remind you that she exists in the run up to her stepping up to a primary role in Book of Boba Fett later this year. But it doesn’t stop it from being somewhat frustrating that Star Wars so regularly goes to this well of familiarity, like cinching a net tighter and tighter around its supposedly-vast galaxy.

undefined

Screenshot: Lucasfilm

Advertisement

This is a problem Star Wars has faced pretty much since it began, long before it became an issue in this Disney-owned era of the franchise, rather than something particular to The Bad Batch. And of course, the show already did this itself, integrating the origins of Caleb Dume’s transition from Jedi Padawan on the run to Kanan Jarrus, Jedi hero of the early Rebellion into its premiere episode. But Fennec’s integration here, even as a potentially extended threat to our heroes, feels less like a natural use of her character and more like it’s Star Wars crossing over itself for the sake of it. We’re going to spend time with Fennec in that upcoming show. Why does she need to be here in The Bad Batch other than to say “Here’s a person you know from another show!”? We’ll have to wait and see just what becomes of her hunt for the bounty on Omega’s head going forward. But hopefully if exploring the criminal underworld’s approach to the rise of the Empire is something The Bad Batch is keen to explore, it’ll be able to do so with characters we’re less familiar with beyond her in the future.


For more, make sure you’re following us on our Instagram @io9dotcom.

Advertisement

Sounds Like the Snake Eyes Movie (Wisely) Puts G.I. Joe on the Back-Burner

G.I.Joe Origins Star Henry Golding in Character as Snake Eyes walks up a flight of stone stairs in a still from the movie.

Henry Golding as Snake Eyes, or at least as the Snake-Eyes-to-be.
Photo: Paramount

There were a lot of things wrong with the 2009 movie G.I. Joe: Rise of Cobraa lot of things. But it seems like the upcoming film G.I. Joe Origins: Snake Eyes has figured out to avoid them, and thus create the G.I. Joe movie franchise the previous films failed to do. First and foremost on that list? Not worrying about G.I. Joe.

Advertisement

If you weren’t a pretty knowledgeable fan of the franchise when Rise of Cobra came out, watching the film must have been overwhelming and frustrating. It throws so much at the audience—the existence of G.I. Joe, Destro and his metal destroying nanobots, nukes, Duke’s ex-fiancee inexplicably being part of a terrorist organization, evil robot soldiers, a dude who can shape-shift for some reason, a bunch of ninja kids, I could go on and on. There’s never any ground to get grounded upon. People just show up and things just happen.

That appears not to be the case with Snake Eyes, which is, as its title suggests, about the fan-favorite character (played by Henry Golding)’s origin, most especially his time training with the Arashikage ninja clan and his friendship-turned-bitter rival with Storm Shadow, and how the two warriors are eventually drawn into the larger G.I. Joe and Cobra conflict, respectively. As producer Lorenzo di Bonaventura told Entertainment Weekly:

“Both Cobra and G.I. Joe take a back seat to the internal drama of the Arashikage and the [Snake Eyes] character. They are absolutely an element, but it’s looking at it this way: You meet somebody, watch their struggle, the struggle leads to the world of G.I. Joe and Cobra. It does not start as a G.I. Joe-Cobra movie. It starts as an Arashikage movie, a Snake Eyes character arc. You come to realize the Arashikage as they’ve traditionally been are affiliated with the Joes, therefore that brings in Cobra. There is a gradual reveal that there’s a larger world here.”

This was explored in Rise of Cobra, admittedly, but it was given just enough time to distract from the main movie yet not enough time to be compelling on its own. If Snake Eyes succeeds at it however, this is going to give audiences a door to enter the weird, science fiction-y world of G.I. Joe. And assuming that the movie doesn’t portray Snake Eyes as a badass blank slate—which Golding says he isn’t in the same EW interview, and there are enough stills of the movie of Golding without the Snake Eyes mask on that I feel pretty confident he’s right—this will give audiences a reason to actually care about this mute character (who stops speaking for a variety of tragic reasons throughout various Joe media) if they didn’t watch the syndicated ‘80s cartoon religiously. It’s potentially the perfect set-up for the franchise.

“Potentially” being the keyword; we’ll find out when G.I. Joe Origins: Snake Eyes premieres on Jul 23.


For more, make sure you’re following us on our Instagram @io9dotcom

Advertisement

Stern’s New The Mandalorian Pinball Table Includes a Ball-Controlling Baby Yoda

Despite the death of arcades, there’s apparently still enough of a demand for pinball machines for Stern to keep churning out new table designs. The company’s latest design takes inspiration from Star Wars: The Mandalorian and includes a Baby Yoda trapped inside who can use the Force to manipulate the ball’s trajectory.

Advertisement

At CES a couple of years ago, Stern revealed a flashy new pinball machine inspired by Stranger Things that incorporated a new gameplay element using electromagnets to make it appear as if the series’ Eleven character was using her telekinetic powers to grab and hold onto several balls before releasing them all at once. For its new Star Wars: The Mandalorian table, Stern is using a similar trick but this time it’s an electromagnet that simulates a miniature version of Grogu using the Force to redirect the path of an incoming ball.

A hanging target beneath a detailed model of the Razor Crest activates a chaotic multi-ball mode.

A hanging target beneath a detailed model of the Razor Crest activates a chaotic multi-ball mode.
Image: Stern Pinball

Three versions of The Mandalorian pinball machine will be available: Pro, Premium, and Limited Edition options, but all include the Force-wielding Grogu, a miniature version of the Razor Crest ship, audio and video clips from both seasons playing on the marquee, custom voice clips recorded by Carl Weathers as Greef Karga specifically for the table, the series’ theme song, and artwork by comic book artist Randy Martinez.

The Premium and Limited Edition versions of the table add a motorized miniature playfield in the upper corner featuring two flippers and six light-up targets, but the Limited Edition option, of which only 750 are being manufactured, goes one step further with mirrored backglass designed to look like Beskar armor, custom artwork on the cabinet, an upgraded sound system, and anti-reflection glass covering the playfield.

A secondary miniature playfield can be found in the upper corner of the table, which tilts up and down making it extra challenging to hit the light-up targets using the paddle flippers.

A secondary miniature playfield can be found in the upper corner of the table, which tilts up and down making it extra challenging to hit the light-up targets using the paddle flippers.
Image: Stern Pinball

The new Mandalorian table is available now through Stern’s distributor and dealer network, but you’re going to need to collect a few real-life bounties to afford one. The basic Pro version of the pinball machine costs $6,199, while the Premium and Limited Edition models will sell for $7,799 and $9,199, respectively.

Advertisement

Turn Your Amazon Echo Dot Into an Aging Baby Yoda With Male Pattern Baldness

Illustration for article titled Turn Your Amazon Echo Dot Into an Aging Baby Yoda With Male Pattern Baldness

Image: OtterBox

A few months after OtterBox gave the Echo Dot a Baby Yoda facelift last year, Amazon revealed a complete redesign of the smart speaker, making it rounder to squeeze better speakers inside. So OtterBox is back with another Grogu-themed stand for the fourth-generation Echo Dot, but this time around, the Child isn’t looking as adorable.

Advertisement

Admittedly, OtterBox’s first Baby Yoda smart speaker stand made the Force-wielding alien look like it was the victim of a vengeful Sith (or clumsy Jedi) who’d accidentally lopped off the top of his head with a lightsaber, leaving mostly just Grogu’s green pointy ears behind.

undefined

Image: OtterBox

But we’re not sure the Child fares much better this time around, because when the fourth-generation Amazon Echo Dot is paired with OtterBox’s new stand, Grogu looks less like an infant and more like a middle-aged alien who has yet to figure out how to use the Force to battle a severely receding hairline.

If it’s an aesthetic that works for you, however, the $25 smart speaker stand is now available on Amazon to help your May the Fourth celebrations be as happy as possible—just the way the Jedis wanted.

The Epic vs. Apple Hearing Is Already a Disaster

Illustration for article titled The Epic vs. Apple Hearing Is Already a Disaster

Photo: Ina Fassbender/AFP (Getty Images)

The Epic v. Apple trial kicked off on Monday morning, and it’s already devolved into a giant, internet-fueled mess.

Advertisement

First, the court had issues getting both teleconference lines up and running, and even when they were humming along fine, everyone’s lines seemed to be unmuted. On the main line, one person chanted, “Epic Games! Epic Games!” Another chimed in, “I’m going to tell my mom, just don’t pick up the line,” while yet another offered this insightful commentary: “Tim Sweeney better know what he’s doing. If he messes up once, we won’t have iOS back. This call is live, by the way.”

The additional line suffered from the same audio issues as well. About 35 minutes into the hearing, while Epic’s legal team was still giving its opening statement, the audio suddenly cut out. Journalist Geoff Knightley’s livestream of the hearing buzzed with people typing “The audio went out” into the chat. But one audience member figured out he was unmuted.

“FORTNITE SUCKS,” that person yelled into the mic. “Yo, yo, yo, we can’t hear anything, bro. The audio died or some shit.”

The same audience member went on to question if anyone else could hear him. While everyone on the line was unmuted (another person listening in confirmed this), the same person continued his commentary: “Raise your hand if you think Sweeny is gay,” he said before adding “Man, I’m going to hell for this.”

In August 2020, Epic Games purposefully violated its Apple App Store agreement by giving Fortnite players a direct payment method that bypassed the App Store. This is explicitly prohibited by Apple, as it prevents the company from receiving a 30% cut, which Apple takes from most app store transactions. But Epic didn’t just violate its agreement with Apple. It put on a showcase designed to put one of Apple’s business practices in a big, anti-trust spotlight.

Apple responded to Epic’s intentional rules violation by booting Fortnite from the App Store; in turn, Epic sued Apple, which brings us to today’s mess.

Advertisement

After about 10 minutes into the dead feed, the court got the audio working again. But it wasn’t long before the single-person peanut gallery chimed in again. “Please don’t free Fortnite!”

The lawyer continued on for a minute, but was quickly interrupted again by the same person breathing heavily into the mic and making what I can only describe as drunk train whistle noises before shouting, “Reddit, Reddit, Reddit.”

Advertisement

From there, a verbal tug of war happened. The second one of the lawyers started talking, the same person would scream incoherent babble into the mic, forcing the lawyer to stop. A second of sweet, sweet silence would ensue before the same person would start again.

As if this writing, it seems like the court finally figured out how to mute everyone. The court probably should have streamed this hearing on its YouTube page, like it’s been doing with other hearings, including others related to Epic v. Apple. Hopefully, they figure out these technical issues or decide to stream the audio to everyone for the rest of the hearing this week.

Advertisement

Otherwise, we’ll be treated to the same “insightful commentary” of audience members who sound like they should be in school instead of interrupting a court proceeding with animal noises.

This Week’s Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Illustration for article titled This Week's Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Image: Lego, Medicom, and Hasbro

Toys and CollectiblesAction figures, statues, exclusives, and other merchandise. Beware: if you look here, you’re probably going to spend some money afterwards.

Welcome back to Toy Aisle, io9’s regular round-up of the latest toy news and tempting plastic goodness. This week: Luigi hops in on the Lego Super Mario fun, Hasbro returns to The Clone Wars, and you can have the power… to wield a very large He-Man sword. Check it out!

Advertisement


Illustration for article titled This Week's Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Image: Lego

Lego Super Mario Adventures with Luigi Starter Course

Long considered Mario’s sad-sack younger sibling, Luigi has been slowly climbing the fan favorite ladder thanks to Nintendo’s Year of Luigi back in 2013 and his own games with the Luigi’s Mansion series. If you needed more proof that Luigi’s star was on the rise, Lego has revealed a new version of its Lego Super Mario Starter Course featuring the green plumber leading the charge. It’s available for pre-order now for $60 with shipping expected on August 1 and includes new challenges like a seesaw and baddies like Boom Boom and a Bone Goomba. It also comes with a new Pink Yoshi figure as well as new game sound effects not available with Mario.


Illustration for article titled This Week's Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Image: Medicom

Advertisement

Medicom Mafex The Mandalorian IG-11 and Grogu

We may be well beyond IG-11’s heroic sacrifice in the first season finale of The Mandalorian, but Medicom is honoring the droid assassin-turned-very-aggressive-nanny with its latest Mafex figure. Clocking in at over 7″ tall, IG-11 comes with two blasters to go commando with, a serving tray complete with drinks, and even a swappable chest piece to display his self-destruct device. But his best accessory is, of course, little Grogu himself, packed away in his satchel to be hoisted around IG-11’s chest. IG’s set to release in Japan in January of next year, for about $99. [Medicom]

Advertisement


Illustration for article titled This Week's Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Image: Hasbro

Advertisement

Hasbro Tiger Electronics Jurassic Park LCD Video Game

We all knew we were getting the same basic gameplay every time we bought one of Tiger’s electronic games, but somehow the packaging and artwork on the handhelds made us completely forget that fact, and it’s happening again almost 3o years later. Last year Hasbro revealed it was bringing back a handful of Tiger’s classic handheld LCD games, but apparently those four were just the beginning because come August it will also release the original Jurassic Park version, which has players dodging dinos while trying to escape the park. Let’s not pretend this is going to hold anyone’s attention for longer than a few minutes, but for $15 who’s complaining?

Advertisement


Factory Entertainment Masters Of The Universe Power Sword Limited Edition Prop Replica

You to, can have The Power!!!!!!!, as long as you can hold up Factory Entertainment’s 40″+ long, stainless-steel-bladed replica of Prince Adam’s iconic, transformative weapon from Masters of the Universe. Adapting the simple, clean aesthetic of the classic cartoon, the sword also has a leather wrapped handle. You’ll have to put down a pretty penny to have the power though: the sword is set to release early next year for the hefty prince’s ransom of $550. [Factory]

Advertisement


Illustration for article titled This Week's Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Image: Playmobil

Advertisement

Playmobil Dragons: Race to the Edge Figures

What started as a fun animated film (surprisingly not made by Pixar) back in 2010 with How to Train Your Dragon has grown into a huge franchise with countless sequels, books, several animated series, and lots of toys, including Playmobil’s latest additions based on the Dragons: Race to the Edge cartoon that ran for five seasons. The new sets should be available starting today and include Hiccup and Toothless ($35), Astrid and Stormfly ($35), Snotlout and Hookfang ($35), Fishlegs and Meatlug ($40), Ruffnut and Tuffnut with Barf and Belch ($55), as well as smaller $30 set that includes Gobber the Belch with a Sheep Sling and target baskets—two critical components for holding dragon racing competitions.

Advertisement


Advertisement

Hasbro Star Wars: The Black Series 50th Anniversary Clone Wars Figures

Hasbro’s excuse to celebrate Lucasfilm’s 50th anniversary with as many figures as possible continues, this time with a throwback to the 2008 era of action figures for the then-new Star Wars: The Clone Wars. Four figures, exclusive to Target, are joining the 6″ line in special package replicating the casings the original 2008 3.75″ figures were in: Anakin and Obi-Wan, featuring realistic takes on their Clone Wars styles, as well as Arc Trooper Echo and Clone Pilot Hawk. They’re set to be available at the retailer this summer, for $25 apiece. [Toyark]

Advertisement


Illustration for article titled This Week's Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Image: Hasbro

Advertisement

Hasbro Monopoly: Jurassic Park Edition Board Game

Hasbro could have simply re-released the original version of Monopoly with its play money updated to include the iconic Jurassic Park T-rex silhouette and we’d have lined up to buy it, but Monopoly: Jurassic Park Edition goes much farther with the theme. In addition to rexbucks, the game has players collecting iconic properties from around Isla Nublar and trying to build fences to protect them, because while the game’s standard tokens have been replaced by characters from the movie, there’s also an additional T-rex token that stomps around the board causing damage and costing players money. The $30 game even includes the Jurassic Park front gate that when activated plays either the movie’s theme song or a dinosaur roar, letting players know how much money they can collect. Life finds a payday.

Advertisement


Illustration for article titled This Week's Best Toys Are Packing Baby Yoda Heat

Image: CubicFun

Advertisement

CubicFun Light-up Titanic 3D Puzzle

For a while 3D puzzles were the rage, and then we all got smartphones and silently judging our friends’ weird-looking babies on Instagram became a more enjoyable way to pass the time. But over a year into a pandemic we’re all running out of distractions (and weird babies), so now’s as good a time as any to jump back into 3D puzzles with this 34-inch long detailed replica of the Titanic
you can build without the need for tape or glue. Made from pre-cut printed paper attached to foam board for rigidity, the $46 puzzle ups the ante with included LED string lights that can be carefully installed to make the ship, and its countless windows, glow at night.

Advertisement


For more, make sure you’re following us on our Instagram @io9dotcom.

Advertisement