The Pixel 6 Is Officially Coming Oct. 19

The Pixel 6 Is Officially Coming Oct. 19

As for the Pixels themselves, the latest rumors peg the standard Pixel 6 as starting at around $750 and featuring a 6.4-inch AMOLED display, 128GB of base storage, and two rear cameras, with the more premium Pixel 6 Pro coming in much higher at around $1,050 and featuring a larger 6.7-inch AMOLED display, 12GB of RAM, 128GB of base storage, and three rear cameras including a telephoto cam with a 4x optical zoom.

After Google pushed out Android 12 to AOSP yesterday without making the update available for Pixel devices, it’s basically guaranteed that Google will devote a portion of the event to some of the new Pixel-specific features and software in Android 12.

There’s also a chance we see some new Nest devices—maybe a new speaker of some sort—or possibly the appearance of Google’s long-rumored foldable Pixel. But for now, any additional details about Google’s Pixel launch remain somewhat sparse, so check back here Oct. 19 for all the news from the event.

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Facebook Paid the FTC Billions to Personally Protect Zuckerberg, Lawsuit Claims

I said it before to much acclaim, and I’ll say it again…  How many times must facebook be allowed to absolutely RUIN the fucking country before people just wake the fuck up already and get rid of this nonsense.  No one’s lives have been improved by social media.  In fact, we are all far worse off.

Litecoin Price Thrown Into Chaos After Hoax Announcement of Partnership with Walmart

No, Walmart Is Not Adopting Litecoin

It’s unclear at this time who may be responsible for the hoax announcement. At the time of publication, Walmart hadn’t returned Gizmodo’s request for comment. We will update this story if they get back to us.

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Apple’s Stranglehold on In-App Purchases Smacked Down in Epic Court Decision

The injunction will take effect in 90 days. Apple could, and likely will, appeal the decision.

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In an emailed statement to Gizmodo, an Apple spokesperson wrote, “Today the Court has affirmed what we’ve known all along: the App Store is not in violation of antitrust law. As the Court recognized ‘success is not illegal.’ Apple faces rigorous competition in every segment in which we do business, and we believe customers and developers choose us because our products and services are the best in the world.”

“We remain committed to ensuring the App Store is a safe and trusted marketplace that supports a thriving developer community and more than 2.1 million U.S. jobs, and where the rules apply equally to everyone,” the Apple spokesperson added.

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In late August, Apple had already proposed a settlement in a separate lawsuit that would have allowed developers to use registration data such as email to inform users of ways to pay outside the App Store—which would serve as a workaround of sorts to shelling out nearly a third of every transaction to Apple but would be a far cry from the kind of changes ordered by the new injunction. In a settlement in yet another case with the Japan Fair Trade Commission announced last week, Apple conceded that it would allow developers of subscription-based apps that provide content like movies, music, newspapers, and e-books to link within the app to other payment portals. However, that settlement did not cover iOS games—a massively lucrative market for in-app purchases.

It’s not clear, as of this moment, how wide the ramifications will be beyond the App Store specifically. Google, which also booted Fortnite from its Play Store in response to Epic’s moves, is facing a similar lawsuit that has yet to be resolved.

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As flagged by the Verge, Gonzalez Rogers also resolved another baffling dispute in the case: Whether or not the Fortnite character Peely the banana, who is technically naked because his bare peel is his skin, would have to wear clothes while appearing in court. The issue arose when an Apple attorney cross-examining an Epic executive quipped that Apple had opted to show Peely wearing a tuxedo in his “Agent Peely” cosmetics, as it was more appropriate for federal court. (No one wears tuxedos to court but My Cousin Vinny, but hey.) An attorney for Epic, responding to the joke, later asked the executive if there is “there anything inappropriate about Peely without clothes,” to which he responded, “It’s just a banana man.”

Gonzalez Rogers wrote in an aside in the ruling that the court agreed that “as Peely is ‘just a banana man,’ additional attire was not necessary but informative.” So that’s settled.

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This is a breaking news story and will be updated…

AT&T Leaves New Orleans Unable to Contact 911 During Hurricane Ida

AT&T Leaves New Orleans Unable to Contact 911 During Hurricane Ida

AT&T, for its part, has been pushing to restore its cell service across the region. Early Monday, the company said that 60% of its wireless network was fully operational—and when contacted by Gizmodo, a spokesperson pointed to its latest blog post noting that its wireless network in Louisiana was operating at 85% of its normal capacity. They added that “the numbers have been improving,” and that AT&T plans “an additional update later today.”

Other telco operators are reporting similar numbers in Ida’s wake. On Monday, T-Mobile publicly stated that it reached 70% of functionality across all of Louisiana. Verizon’s most recent numbers put it at 85% functionality, with the company noting that “hard hit areas that were experiencing loss of service yesterday are now fully or partially restored.”

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Of course, it’s Louisiana isn’t a stranger to dealing with downed power lines and 911-center outages in the wake of a massive natural disaster. In the wake of hurricane Katrina back in 2004, the Federal Communications Commission actually put out a massive tome detailing what the agency had “learned” in the aftermath of the storm that had left so many power grids and phone lines downed. Per the FCC’s report, Katrina knocked out close to 40 911 call-centers across Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama., along with over 1,000 cellphone sites. An estimated 20 million phone calls didn’t go through. We’re still trying to piece together the tens of billions of dollars in damage that Ida left in its wake, but hopefully, we’re going to see AT&T face the FCC’s line of fire sometime soon.

Correction 5:13 PM ET: A previous version of this story stated that AT&T’s current coverage at 70% capacity, not the 85% as the company’s blog suggests. We regret the error.

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TikTok Is Reportedly Testing 5-Minute Video Upload Lengths

TikTok Is Reportedly Testing 5-Minute Video Upload Lengths

TikTok did not immediately respond to Gizmodo’s request for comment and we’ll update this post when we receive a reply.

The video social network is best known for hosting bite-sized, highly sharable videos that can be consumed in excess exactly because of their brevity, so it’s anyone’s guess how longer-form content will play among audiences with increasingly short attention spans. It should be noted that the platform’s most popular videos currently center around a viral challenge where people severely injure themselves by falling off stacks of milk crates, which admittedly doesn’t demand the rigor of a long-form video format.

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The news of the longer video upload lengths comes just a week after Navarra also reported that TikTok is set to deploy “TikTok Stories,” the Instagram-Snapchat-Fleets copycat feature that will allow users to post content that disappears after 24 hours. Although TikTok has confirmed that a Stories feature is indeed in the works, there is currently no set date for such a feature might become widely available for public use.