My Pillow Goblin Sues Dominion for $1.6 Billion, Swears His Pillows Aren’t Filled With Knives

Current status of Frankspeech dot com

Current status of Frankspeech dot com
Screenshot: Gizmodo/FrankSpeech.com

Americans had prepared today (and also last week) for MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell to unleash his nebulous avant-garde invention, Frank: a social media platform billed as a cross between YouTube and Twitter with elements of newspapers and television, except with free speech. We’ll have to wait a little longer to see the nexus realized.

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Frank is currently down for an indeterminate length of time, but Lindell is offering an alternative spectacle. The homepage of FrankSpeech.com currently hosts the “Frankathon,” a 48-hour Lindell-hosted livestream broadcast set in a sort of news studio. He has a mug. The event opened today in full meltdown conspiracy mode.

“It was the biggest attack on a website, probably in history,” Lindell said of the failed launch. While Lindell has not yet specified exactly who attacked his website and how, the theory seems to be evolving live, with increasing certainty that this was the biggest cyberattack of all time. (A bucket of clues include attackers from “all over the world,” “Zuckabuck from Facebook,” and the inability to talk about “vaccines and machines.”) At this writing, Lindell says that 15 million viewers have tuned in.

We’ve reached out to My Pillow for comment and will update when we hear back.

Lindell’s headline news, though, is the announcement that My Pillow is counter-suing Dominion Voting Systems for $1.6 billion for defamation, which he has framed as a defense of free speech. Court records show the lawsuit, which claims violations of the First and Fourteenth Amendments, was filed on Monday in the U.S. District Court in Minnesota.

The sum is slightly higher than the $1.3 billion in damages Dominion is currently seeking from Lindell in its own defamation suit, targeting Lindell’s wild fabrications that the company conspired with Democrats to steal the election from Donald Trump. (The site showed a looping video of Lindell’s claims, which I won’t repeat here. Dominion has also sued Fox News for allowing Lindell to make such claims without challenging their veracity.) Lindell has enlisted a legal A-team including prominent First Amendment attorney Nathan Lewin and Alan Derschowitz, primarily known for advising on the O.J. Simpson trial and defending Harvey Weinstein. (Both, the Daily Beast has noted, are longtime registered Democrats.) In a motion to dismiss, My Pillow’s attorneys argue that Dominion has engaged in “lawfare,” using the suits to “restrict the marketplace of ideas to one viewpoint.”

Dominion has argued that Lindell’s “viewpoint” (read: hysterical accusations) has caused them irreparable harm and led to an onslaught of violent threats against employees.

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Dershowitz, appearing on the Frankathon this morning via video, made a crystal clear point to distance himself from certain harmful misinformation that would likely be welcome on Lindell’s platform. Unprompted, he said, of free speech:

I defend the right of bigots and ignoramuses to say the Holocaust didn’t occur. It’s wrong, it’s foolish, it’s bigoted, it’s insulting. It affects my family. But I think they’re right to say it. If you want to say the Earth is flat, say the Earth is flat. The geologists will come and prove you wrong, historians will be wrong about the Holocaust.

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Lindell also said:

“…It would be like if My Pillow was out there, and all these people were saying there’s rocks and knives in my pillows. And I would just say what I would do as the owner. I would say, ‘hey, everybody, look… there’s no rocks or knives.’”

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Okay…

Dershowitz does plan to uncover the truth behind Dominion’s election conduct in discovery, in which he’ll demand access to Dominion’s machines and source code, in case completely unsubstantiated social media-sourced conspiracy theories prove to be true.

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You can watch unfolding events here. Steve Bannon and Diamond and Silk are on the docket. And you can view the lawsuit below.

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MyPillow Guy Says He’s Starting Some Kind of Little Twitter Platform That’s ‘Not Just Like a Little Twitter Platform’

Illustration for article titled MyPillow Guy Says He’s Starting Some Kind of Little Twitter Platform That’s 'Not Just Like a Little Twitter Platform'

Photo: Drew Angerer (Getty Images)

Mike Lindell, America’s pillow man, may be being sued for $1.3 billion for spreading hoax, pro-Donald Trump conspiracy theories claiming election tech manufacturer Dominion Voting Systems engaged in massive fraud to get Joe Biden into office. But soon that might only be a sliver of the MyPillow founder’s riches, because he’s launching some sort of tech company!

Per Mediaite, Lindell—who is banned from Twitter and definitely doesn’t seem extremely mad about it—said in an appearance on Turning Point USA executive director Charlie Kirk’s podcast on Friday that he will be launching a company to rival Twitter or even YouTube. What’s more, it will be up in just a few short weeks!

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Lindell suggested that his stillunnamed platform will be friendlier to conservative viewpoints than other competitors, something that has never been tried before or resulted in physical disaster, and since he owns it, he’ll allow users to tell it “like it is” without the threat of any kind of pushback. It will also boast a rich feature set when it launches in around a month. From Mediaite:

“What we’re going to do, it’s going to take four or five weeks, were going to have this platform coming out that all the influencers in this country will be able to go to and not worry about YouTube and actually be able to talk,” Lindell told Kirk. “So what we’re doing, we’re launching this big platform, so all the voices of our country can come back and start telling it like it is again.”

“It’s not just like a little Twitter platform,” Lindell stated before adding that the project has been in the works for four years.

“I have a platform coming out,” Lindell added elsewhere in the episode. “I can’t say the name… in ten days. Every single influencer person on the planet can come there, you’re gonna have a platform to speak out, and you’re gonna have, and you will not need YouTube, you won’t need these places. So it will be where everything can be told because we gotta get our voices back.”

What a stunning accomplishment for a man who appears to have no prior experience or qualifications in non-pillow-related technology, save coining the term “cyberly.” Twitter’s market cap is estimated at around $50.67 billion, and YouTube parent company Alphabet’s market cap is estimated at around $1.36 trillion, which is to say that Lindell is now on track to be worth somewhere between $50.67 billion and $1.36 trillion in just four to five weeks.

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To quote a wise man: Wow!

Lindell used the rest of his appearance on Kirk’s show to continue promoting his baseless conspiracy theory that a hostile foreign nation such as China worked in tandem with Democratic plants in the U.S. to steal the election, though he said he hasn’t provided his evidence to the government because he doesn’t trust it. (Note that Lindell has previously released what he said was complete and total proof the election was stolen in a rambling, two-hour diatribe literally titled Absolute Proof.) He also plugged MyPillow promo codes.

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Yes sir, everything’s coming up Lindell, including that aforementioned $1.3 billion Dominion lawsuit, which Lindell is apparently convinced will prove him right about the election via the court-ordered discovery process. He’s lucky that’s the case, especially if soon he’ll have a brand new platform to leave a rich text record of defamatory statements on.

MyPillow Genius Says He’s Absolutely Thrilled to Be Sued By Dominion for $1.3 Billion

Illustration for article titled MyPillow Genius Says Hes Absolutely Thrilled to Be Sued By Dominion for $1.3 Billion

Photo: Justin Sullivan (Getty Images)

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, the rabidly pro-Trump pillow magnate who bafflingly became one of the key figures in the ex-president’s efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 elections, is now facing a billion-dollar defamation lawsuit from election tech manufacturer Dominion Voting Systems. While the suit appears to be a slam dunk, the pillow truther claims to be thrilled.

Dominion was smeared by right-wing conspiracists with an elaborate hoax theory that the company acted as a fraud factory that flipped countless thousands of votes for Trump to Biden—possibly in collusion with China, Venezuela, or some other nefarious foreign power. This did not occur, and multiple states have confirmed Dominion’s vote counts were accurate, but the company says the viral conspiracy theories immensely damaged its reputation and financial standing. Lindell, who sells pillows to conservatives with ads on networks like Fox News, was one of the most active promoters of the Dominion angle. He repeatedly used his now-banned Twitter account and right-wing networks like Newsmax and One America News to spread lies about the company.

Lindell doubled down even after Dominion sent him a cease-and-desist letter and launched $1.3 billion defamation suits against Trump’s campaign attorneys, Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, for making similar claims. He even released a multi-hour, unintentionally funny “documentary” called Absolute Proof, which did not contain any proof of the nonexistent fraud, but did feature Lindell coining words like “cyberly” and exclaiming “wow!” or “what?” dozens of times.

Dominion is now suing Lindell for more than $1.3 billion in damages in federal court, per the New York Times, arguing that the pillow man is a “talented salesman and former professional card counter—[who] sells the lie to this day because the lie sells pillows.” The voting tech firm also alleged that Lindell was running a “defamatory marketing campaign,” to profiteer off conservatives’ disbelief that Trump would go out a one-term President. MyPillow sales skyrocketed 30-40% after Lindell started using promo codes like “FightforTrump” and “QAnon” to lure Trump’s gullible followers into believing the pillow bucket was somehow connected to the fascism bucket.

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The suit names dozens of times Lindell lied about Dominion, claiming the pillow man was “well aware of the independent audits and paper ballot recounts conclusively disproving the Big Lie.”

“No amount of money can repair the damage that’s been done by these lies, which are easily disproved,” Dominion wrote in the suit. “Hundreds of documented audits and recounts have proven that Dominion machines accurately counted votes. We look forward to proving these facts in a court of law.”

According to the Associated Press, Lindell explained that he was in fact very excited about being sued (he previously told the Daily Beast he has lured Dominion into a clever little legal trap, as he believes the discovery process will turn up evidence proving the fraud occurred.)

“It’s a very good day,” Lindell told the AP. “I’ve been looking forward to them finally suing… I’d love to go to court tomorrow with Dominion.”

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In a separate statement to the Wall Street Journal, Lindell said that “I have all the evidence on them. Now this will get disclosed faster, all the machine fraud and the attack on our country.”

Dominion was also very excited about going into the discovery process, because it will not prove the fraud occurred.

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“… Through discovery, Dominion will prove that there is no real evidence supporting the Big Lie,” the suit states, according to CNN. “Dominion brings this action to vindicate the company’s rights, to recover damages, to seek a narrowly tailored injunction, to stand up for itself and its employees, and to stop Lindell and MyPillow from further profiting at Dominion’s expense.”

If, as Dominion’s suit argues, Lindell was in it for the money, it may have backfired big time. Retailers that have dropped MyPillow products in the past few months have included Bed Bath & Beyond and Kohl’s, though both companies told the Journal the change was due to lagging sales of Lindell’s pillows rather than his campaign to put Trump back in office.

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