Monica Rambeau Scenes Were Cut From WandaVision and Here’s Why!

Teyonah Parris as Monica Rambeau in Wandavision

Teyonah Parris as Monica Rambeau in Wandavision
Image: Marvel Entertainment

WandaVision writer Jac Schaeffer has been holding OUT!

On Entertainment Weekly’s The Awardist podcast with Schaeffer discusses why a specific scene from Monica Rambeau’s (Teyonah Parris) story had to be cut.

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“My pitch was mapped to the stages of grief, it ended up being kind of a reductive thing,” said Schaeffer. “I don’t know if you know this or not, Teyonah, but [Monica] had a therapist in the base, the pop-up base. There were therapy scenes because we, in the [writers’] room, were very pro-therapy.”

WandaVision remained invested in exploring the effects of grieving and trauma. If you’ve watched the show, you know Monica Rambeau went through a lot to become the hero she is today, and Schaeffer was itching to give the audience access into her psyche with scenes of her speaking to a therapist. Unfortunately, it was deleted due to timing. Schaeffer states, “We were like, ‘Well, we’ve got to have a therapist,’ and then realized that there’s not a lot of time in the pop-up [S.W.O.R.D.] base [outside Westview] for Monica to be stepping into her sessions at all.”

Well, that sucks! I hope they release the scene because I would like to know what’s going on inside Monica’s head. It might give us some perspective of what’s to come when Monica, Carol Danvers (Brie Larson), and Kamala Khan (Iman Vellani) come together in the film The Marvels set to release in 2022.

What do you think? Should they release that deleted scene? Let us know!


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Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Foretold WandaVision’s Plot in Song

Rebecca Bunch realizing that she’s a villain.
Gif: The CW

Before the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen) moved to Westview, New Jersey in hopes of starting a new life with the person she loved, there was Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s Rebecca Bunch (Rachel Bloom). She’s an over-stressed lawyer who, like Wanda, confidently believed that she could will a new life for herself into existence simply by telling people that she’d become a different person.

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Ridiculous as the CW’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend often was, its story was always rooted in Rebecca’s genuine love for the people around her, and her larger process of coming to terms with some longstanding neuroses she needed to see a therapist about. Though it was billed as a comedy, the show also made an effort at multiple points to convey how, even though Rebecca was ostensibly the protagonist, she’d done more than enough messed-up things in pursuit of a man that she became the true villain of her own story. Toward its series finale, WandaVision began circling around a similar conclusion about its own titular heroine, but never quite got around to spelling things out or really having Wanda face the consequences of her actions. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend got to this important point much earlier in its story and with much less wiggle room for its central character at a time when she was doing some genuinely unhinged things.

Rachel’s major reason for moving to West Covina, California in the first place boiled down to the fact that after years of being apart, she was still madly in love with Josh Chan (Vincent Rodriguez III), who she’d dated for a few months as a teenager. Though Rachel had no business in West Covina, Josh being there (and her being unhappy in New York City) was all it took to convince her to pack up her things, and relocate, all of which were wildly irresponsible things to do for a man who wasn’t even really checking for her like that still. But in West Covina, Rachel quickly made new friends and began cobbling together a new chapter for herself, all the while lying to people about her motivations; eventually, Josh did come back into her orbit, figuring that the pair could become pals once again. Clueless a person as Josh generally was, he had no idea the lengths Rebecca was willing to go to in order to “accidentally” show up places he would be in hopes of re-igniting their old flame. Rebecca, by contrast, was always very aware of the wildness of her actions, which is partially why she would confide in people like her colleague Paula Proctor (Donna Lynne Champlin), who could understand that she really didn’t mean Josh any harm.

Though Crazy-Ex Girlfriend’s musical flights of fancy often skewed fantastical, the show always treated its songs as representations of what was going through character’s heads rather than actual things they were saying. But much in the same way that Wanda’s Westview Hex warped those trapped within it to become supporting characters in her domestic fantasy, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend very smartly depicted Rebecca as a chaos agent whose presence encouraged other people to act on their more reckless impulses. Sympathetic and often encouraging as Paula was of Rachel’s decisions, things like her plan to convince Josh to leave his girlfriend Valencia (Gabrielle Ruiz) were quite villainous, and it wasn’t until one of Rebecca’s earliest ploys to ensnare Josh nearly worked that she stopped for a moment to consider whether what she was doing made her the bad guy.

After a surprising kiss made clear that there was some degree of attraction between Rebecca and Josh, in a fit of guilt he felt compelled to confess what happened to Valencia, and planned to take a trip to Hawaii to think about his actions regardless of how his confession played out. Rebecca, trying to grease the wheels a bit, lied to Josh about having broken up with her own boyfriend, and after a conversation with Paula, resolved to stop Josh from telling Valencia what happened in hopes that the kiss might be the beginning of their new relationship. Given how guileless Josh generally was, there’s a good chance that had Rebecca stopped him and said she also “just so happened” to be on her way to Hawaii, it’s likely that he would have fallen for her ploy. But instead, she missed him by mere moments, and when Josh told Valencia about the kiss, she was none-too-pleased about it—though she forgave him all the same, mainly because those kinds of things weren’t what got at her insecurities.

As Rebecca stopped to consider how she’d recently pawned a number of her valued items (including a family heirloom) in order to buy a plane ticket to chase a man, she can’t deny that she’s wandered into a dark place in pursuit of Josh. “The Villain In My Own Story,” a song featured in Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s season one episode “Josh Is Going to Hawaii!”, deconstructs and plays with a number of the tropes present in romcom narratives to comedic effect. But while Rebecca daydreams about herself being an evil witch plotting to murder Valencia, envisioned as a Kate Hudson-type princess, the song repeatedly lands on the conclusion that Rebecca is, in fact, the bad guy at hand. Funny as the song is in the moment, it would come define a lot of Rebecca’s characterization in the series as it explored some of the deeper sources of her neuroses and compulsive behavior.

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend made no qualms about calling out its heroine for her bullshit, and in doing so, set itself up to be a much more honest exploration of her personality and the consequences of her actions. When Wanda pops up next in the MCU, it would be very interesting if it somehow involved a magical music number, but frankly more surprising if it centered on holding Wanda accountable for the mess she made in Westview.

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend is now streaming on the CW, and WandaVision is streaming on Disney+.

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Doctor Strange 2 Had to Be Rewritten When Marvel Cut Strange From WandaVision

Strange happenings behind the scenes.

Strange happenings behind the scenes.
Image: Marvel Studios

Benedict Cumberbatch was signed to appear as Doctor Strange on the finale of WandaVision. Then Marvel decided against it and had to change everything.

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Rolling Stone spoke to Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige and he explained how this surprising news all went down. Basically, because Marvel had announced Wanda (Elizabeth Olsen) would be appearing in the Doctor Strange sequel Doctor Strange and Multiverse of Madness, the plan was for Cumberbatch to appear on the show to tie into that movie. One version had him pop up in one of WandaVision’s commercials. Another had the commercials as actual messages from Strange to Wanda. But eventually, they just cut him out.

“Some people might say, ‘Oh, it would’ve been so cool to see Doctor Strange,’” Feige told Rolling Stone. “But it would have taken away from Wanda, which is what we didn’t want to do. We didn’t want the end of the show to be commoditized to go to the next movie—here’s the white guy, ‘Let me show you how power works.’”

Once Strange’s link to Wanda was cut out of the show, the movie itself had to be changed too, most likely to add in the bit of story linking the Sorcerer Supreme and Scarlet Witch that would’ve happened on the show. As the MCU stands now, WandaVision left Wanda alone in some faraway place, studying up on her new powers. Some have suggested she got away too easily, without paying the price for what she did to the people of Westview, but Olsen herself has a tease about that.

“She had to get away before the people who have to hold her accountable got there,” Olsen told the magazine. “And where she went is a place that no one could find her. Because she knows that she is going to be held accountable, and I think she has a tremendous amount of guilt.”

It sounds like that might be a clue to how Wanda plays into the Multiverse of Madness. We’ll find out March 25, 2022.


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WandaVision’s Suburban Sadness Is a Reminder of Our Failures—and What Needs to Change

Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany in WandaVision bliss.

Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany in WandaVision bliss.
Image: Disney

Watching Disney+ and Marvel’s WandaVision as someone who I would say is, at best, loosely versed in the MCU means I missed a lot of the subtext io9 has delved deep into. But as someone who regularly writes about destructive systems at Gizmodo’s other subsite, Earther, what stood out to me was not just the struggle between Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen), Monica Rambeau (Teyonah Parris), SWORD, and the danger of the military-industrial complex. Rather it was the quiet destruction wrought by the show’s backdrop: the suburbs.

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It’s rare for me to be current on pop culture. For example, I watched 2017’s Thor: Ragnarok on an airplane in 2019 so I could finally watch 2019’s Avengers: Endgame in 2020. So the fact that I have managed to watch WandaVision within a month(ish) of its final episode is a huge win for me. (Please clap.) But it was an intriguing concept, as many fans have already noticed. Suburbia has always been a central setting in sitcoms. The two grew in tandem in post-World War II America, with the neatly lined streets offering the perfect anodyne backdrop for everything from The Dick Van Dyke Show to The Brady Bunch to Bewitched. The dream of these areas as the perfect place to raise a family was in many ways reinforced by early sitcoms. Those series happily swept the racism in how suburbs were created under the rug and papered over the very real ecological and psychological damage they caused.

What struck me about WandaVision was how its characters quietly surfaced some of the underlying trauma of sprawl. Where the sitcoms it borrows from cover up those tears, WandaVision opens them up more and more as the show develops. On the surface, life in Westview—the fictional New Jersey town is perfect, given the state is almost one giant suburb bisected by four-lane roads, shopping plazas, and diners—appears to be about having it all. Wanda has the love of her life, a spacious home, and eventually, two young kids. Yet the inner pain of life in the ‘burbs begins to creep through as the show goes on.

Our first glimmer is when Vision breaks Wanda’s spell in “On a Very Special Episode…,” allowing his co-worker Norm to tell him a bit of what’s going on inside his head (short answer: it hurts). He does the same with Agnes in the next episode (though we later learn Agnes was, of course, faking it), and again hears about the pain of living in Wanda’s Westview. When Agnes/Agatha later does the same for a number of Westview residents, they beg not to go back under Wanda’s spell because all they can feel is her sadness. In “Previously On,” Wanda herself is forced to confront that pain by walking through a door Agatha’s basement to relive her past. Sadness is literally lurking in the basement of Westview, just underneath the surface.

Illustration for article titled WandaVision's Suburban Sadness Is a Reminder of Our Failures—and What Needs to Change

Image: Disney

The show never directly confronts the source of suburban pain, but it’s readily apparent in where the scenes take place. Perhaps the starkest example comes in WandaVision’s Halloween-themed episode where we finally get to the edge of Westview. It’s here the underlying bleakness of the suburbs come through as Vision walks through increasingly smaller neighborhoods with fewer people, and cul-de-sacs that bleed into farmland not yet subdivided. The core lie that the suburbs bring people together is laid bare.

Marvel’s Westview reflects an enduring legacy of federal housing policies that began in the 1930s and accelerated in the coming decades to essentially institutionalize segregation. Subdivisions of the sitcom era were designed for no through traffic and they also iced out public transit, which meant everything was a car ride rather than a walk away. Transportation is now the largest source of American emissions, a testament to the enduring legacy of sprawl. The highways that eventually connected various suburban communities—highways we never see in WandaVision because of the artifice of the source material the show draws on—also plowed through historically Black and brown neighborhoods, leaving behind toxic public health and dangerous climate impacts still with us today.

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The desire outside Wanda’s world to go back to “how things were” is still a powerful undercurrent in modern American society as well. Former President Donald Trump tried to woo “the suburban housewife” during last year’s election, playing up the same tropes of “having it all” as seen on WandaVision and classic sitcoms. His inane comments about how Democrats would “make bigger windows into smaller windows” was an attempt to convince housewives that the picture windows—the likes of which grace Wanda and Vision’s home in Westview—would be gone. (Improbably, President Joe Biden hasn’t come for the big windows yet.)

But WandaVision shows why going back is ultimately impossible. In “The Series Finale,” Wanda collapses the Hex, acknowledging that the idealized lifestyle she’s tried to create simply can’t exist and that she must confront her pain. Similarly, we can’t undo the pain the suburbs have caused, but we also can’t ignore it. To address the rot that suburbs have created means righting wrongs like redlining that left Black communities underinvested in, and building up density again so that walking or taking public transit to work is an option rather than simply driving alone in our cars. That could help reduce the toll on the planet and the isolation of suburban living. Because ultimately, the Hex that is our modern world is just as unsustainable as Wanda’s version.

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WandaVision’s VFX Team on How Working From Home Brought Unexpected Balance

Wanda Maximoff trying to make dinner with magic

Wanda Maximoff trying to make dinner with magic
Image: Disney+/Marvel

Like many of WandaVision’s secrets, the true meaning of the show’s era-specific production values, aesthetics, and practical effects only became clear towards the series finale which properly ushered the Scarlet Witch into the MCU. The story behind some of WandaVision’s use of visual effects goes even deeper than that, though.

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When io9 sat down to speak with the team at MARZ (Monsters Aliens Robots Zombies), one of the studios that worked on the Marvel Disney+ show, VFX supervisor Ryan Freer, co-president Lon Molnar, and managing director Matt Panousis all agreed that working on a series like WandaVision in the midst of an industry-altering pandemic presented more than a few unexpected challenges. Having come out on the other side of the project, though, the trio all agreed that the experience left them confident in the future of comic book adaptations created for the small screen that capture most, if not all, the grandeur of their cinematic counterparts.


Charles Pulliam-Moore, io9: Talk to me about the production process for this show. How much of the plot was the team clued into from the beginning when you guys were brought on?

Ryan Freer: [laughing] Nothing, really. Marvel does a great job of showing you what they need to show you and what your group has to work on. Sometimes we get larger chunks to bid on as one of the vendors on the show, and we get we can kind of piece together what’s going on, but they keep a really, really tight lip.

io9: What was it like being in the dark about the show’s larger arc, but being able to feel out some of its specific shapes because of the work MARZ was doing? 

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Freer: With IP like this, it’s really cool because we know that there is potential stuff coming down the pipeline with Vision and Wanda, and seeing it all it starting to come together is really amazing. A lot of what we were working on this this season had been established before us, and there was a lot of reference out there already for the established Vision, if that makes sense.

io9: Right, yeah.

Freer: We’d never seen him in black and white before, and we’d never seen him do slapstick comedy, and a lot of his silliness this season presented us with a bit of a learning curve.

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Vision and Wanda realizing they’re about to become parents.
Image: Disney+/Marvel

io9: What were some of the final details in this series that casual viewers probably missed because of how WandaVision, at least at first, wasn’t working with a drastically different physical form for Vision? Especially because there’s so much parity between the character’s big and small screen depictions.

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Freer: The general audience, I don’t think, knows that you’re looking at visual effects every time you see Vision. His entire head other than just his eyes, his nose, and just a little bit of his mouth is all CGI. I went on to some Reddit boards, and people were saying, “How was the budget so huge on this show for visual effects?” and I went all the way down through all the boards and nobody really nailed it. There was maybe one person I said “I heard they overlay of visual effects on top of Vision or something,” but…yeah. It’s the art of making art that no one notices.

Matt Panousis: This the second year in a row we’ve had something like this happen because last year we worked on Watchmen, which was MARZ’s comping out party as a company because we’re only two-and-a-half years old. [Looking Glass’ mask] was also an effect that tricked the majority of the audience watching the show. HBO explained to us that after the mask was first introduced, Google searches for the mask jumped, and it just speaks to how seamless this art has gotten. It a little anticlimactic at times, yeah, but the sign of good VFX is always when it’s invisible.

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io9: It’s interesting that you bring budgeting up Ryan, because that’s something that’s become a big part of the way fans speculate about how these projects will shape up after news about them first breaks. What about WandaVision’s use of VFX do you kind of wish audiences grasped better to understand how money’s allocated to these shows?

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Lon Molnar: This might be a good segue to talk about tracking markers, actually. There are some menial tasks that happen that you just have to do on a shot-by-shot basis. They’re putting tracking markers on all over Paul Bettany’s face because we need to track his head, where we’re putting CG elements. But the problem with that is that we have to remove those tracking markers. So we’re paying labor to remove on a frame-by-frame basis the very markers that are necessary for us to do VFX.

Freer: When we first started our relationship with MCU, we did a test shot for Marvel that the studio really liked. This was before we even knew that we were working on black and white vision.

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io9: What was the test?

Freer: They actually tasked us with remaking a shot from Age of Ultron. They sent us a few CG elements from Industrial Light and Magic for his head which were already established. We took that, broke it down ourselves, resurfaced it, and got it to looking like Paul as much as we could within our pipeline because our pipeline was very different than other companies’. Marvel liked our work, and that turned into us working on the 50 or 60 shots from WandaVision’s first episode, which is a pretty big jump from us not having a working relationship before. Those 50 or 60 shots, the studio liked as well, and that we could get them done in a shorter time frame, and that first episode ended up taking us about three-and-a-half, maybe four months.

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Wanda and Vision hearing a sound.
Image: Disney+/Marvel

io9: How tough was that, especially as post-production kicked off last year?

Freer: The toughest thing people always say with working with Marvel is getting your shots [finalized]. Those are director finals, but there’s the supervisors, the producers. But then on top of the producers, there’s also the executives who ultimately have the last call, and if they don’t like it, then it goes all the way back down to the bottom, and the whole process starts over again.

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Sarah [Eim] and Tara [DeMarco], the VFX supervisors on Marvel’s end who we worked with, both had such fine eyes for Vision and other elements in these scenes. I think there was maybe only one or two shots that that actually got it all the way through with no notes, and that’s pretty rare. Even after doing four hundred shots of Vision, I thought that I had a finely-tuned eye for him, but there was always something, something small here and there that you could do to make it better. And yeah, they were always right.

io9: As relatively-new to the game as MARZ is, what was it like for you working on WandaVision and your other projects during a year when the pandemic really upended a lot of entertainment in significant, unexpected ways?

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Panousis: I don’t want to say that we had incredible foresight, because part of it’s also luck, but I do think that especially with what happened last year, the TV business model was hugely helpful. MARZ has done over 40 television projects. A lot of studios will have one or two kind of key marquee projects, but if those happened to be in film last year, that was super problematic. We didn’t let go of a single person during covid, and grew almost 100% during it by virtue of having this model in place and the fact that a lot of what we were working with was shot before the pandemic.

When we decided to bet on putting all our focus into television projects, that was kind of rare for a VFX studio, but in the past two years, it just seems like TV has exploded at a pace faster than what we kind of anticipated.

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Molnar: I’ve been in the industry for 20 plus years and this has always been the challenge with the hours that we do and the time that we dedicate to these shows. Covid, if anything, showed us that you can do this kind of work when you’re working from home, and you can have dinner with your family whereas, in the past, you were commuting an hour-plus into the city on top of time working.

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io9: We’re coming up on The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’s second episode, and looking forward, there are going to be a lot more of these kinds of live-action series, and not just from Marvel. Having seen WandaVision’s finale, and knowing that series are a big part of studios’ future plans for these franchises, what sorts of things are you more interested to see in the genre?

Freer: Going back to my first point, visual effects are always the greatest when you don’t notice that it’s there. There are a lot of shows now, especially like The Falcon and The Winter Soldier that are just kinda like beat-em-up shows, and that’s to be expected. But I think WandaVision was a breath of fresh air even despite that final episode that did feel very much a part of that traditional superhero movie final act. I’m hoping that more stories can see the power of having visual effects that aren’t necessarily right in your face, but help give these shows a deeper focus and detail to these characters and their emotions.

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I’m excited for more stories that want audiences getting excited about who these characters are as people, and not just because they’re showing off what powers they have and blowing things up. I mean yeah, at the end of the day, we’re a visual effects company, and we’ll be there to blow the things up because it’s fun doing that, but it’s also so much fun to work on the subtle things barely anyone notices.

Panousis: I think if you probably asked us a year ago what’s going to happen on WandaVision, I very highly doubt we’d have said “Well, you know, what we’re going to do is they’re going to actually go decade by decade and they’re thinking outside the box.” We’re on our heels, too. We’re talking about a few new projects with Marvel right now, and we…don’t know what to expect. All we can do is do our research and look at the characters and storylines, and try to get a sense of what Disney might try to connect.

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Molnar: One thing that you can see that’s trending, though, is more stories explore these characters in different time periods like what they did with Sam Jackson and Captain Marvel. It’s interesting to consider how that kind of technology can be affordable on a platform like Disney+. I think for us, our goal is to try to break through that technology to make it affordable to be able to place characters in these entirely new contexts because once you can do that, you have a whole new story to tell.


WandaVision is now streaming on Disney+.

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The Falcon and the Winter Soldier Is a Show to Dissect, But in a Different Way From WandaVision

Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan in The Falcon and the Winter Soldier.

Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan in The Falcon and the Winter Soldier.
Photo: Marvel Studios

The Marvel Cinematic Universe has always trained fans to look ahead. To uncover the mysteries. Piece together the connections. Nowhere has that been more evident than in WandaVision, Marvel’s first Disney+ TV series. Fan speculation and excitement for WandaVision was so feverish, in fact, it’s almost a shock that the next show in the MCU, The Falcon and The Winter Soldier, comes only a few weeks later.

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With WandaVision, the world saw how Marvel fans would react to getting a nice piece of content every week for the first time—and they were ravenous. Social media, blogs, and vlogs alike all trying to figure it out in real-time. The team behind The Falcon and The Winter Soldier saw that and, with their show on deck, began to feel the heat.

Last weekend, io9 spoke with The Falcon and The Winter Soldier writer and executive producer Malcolm Spellman and asked him about the fan environment post-WandaVision. Did seeing how the fans reacted to the first series recontextualize how he looked at his own show?

“You feel immense pressure from that, right?” Spellman said of the internet’s reaction. “WandaVision is a mystery and a puzzle in and of itself. And that’s going to trigger fans, especially Marvel fans. They know this whole mythology. They know the books and who knows where it could be going. And of course, that’s going to fire them up.”

“Our show is much more open in the storytelling,” he continued. “And I’m hoping that fans will sort of take what’s happening in the moment [of the show] and the urgency and humanity of what’s happening in the moment at face value, because we’re not playing with as much of a mystery thing.”

Which isn’t to say there won’t be mystery or intrigue in The Falcon and The Winter Soldier or that there won’t be plenty to dig into. It just won’t necessarily be “Who is behind it all?” or “Will Reed Richards show up?” It’ll be more like “Why are these characters reacting this way?” and “What does this say about the world?”

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We dug into a lot more with Spellman, including the kinds of things fans should be thinking deeper about while they watch this Marvel series. Find out more when the rest of our interview runs later this week. The Falcon and The Winter Soldier debuts Friday on Disney+.

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13 WandaVision Facts Magically Revealed in Its Making-of Documentary

Filming the black and white scenes in WandaVision.

Filming the black and white scenes in WandaVision.
Screenshot: Disney+/Marvel Studios

Anytime Vision is actual Vision, that’s an effect. In reality, Bettany is painted purple and his finished look is added on later. Since that’s expensive, the producers would always discussed how often he needed to be in that form. The answer was when the story dictated it. So, when Vision is home, he’s comfortable, and he’s his true self. (Side note: in the black and white episodes, the purple didn’t work for effects so they had to paint him blue.)

The Comics That Sold Out Thanks to WandaVision Are Going Back to Press

Illustration for article titled The Comics That Sold Out Thanks to WandaVision Are Going Back to Press

Image: Olivier Coipel/Marvel

Maybe you missed out on stockpiling the comics that can give some background to WandaVision, or maybe you desperately miss the show and are craving whatever related content you can get. Either way, Marvel’s got your back.

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According to Entertainment Weekly, Marvel has gone back to print with series like Tom King’s The Vision, James Robinson’s Scarlet Witch, and Steve Englehart’s Vision and Scarlet Witch. They will also be increasing stock of House of M, which ran out “almost overnight” following WandaVision’s premiere.

Of course these are all available digitally, but for purists who need copies in-hand, they will be available soon.

The comics delivered inspiration and Easter eggs alike in WandaVision, starting with the infamous “Maison du Mepris” wine bottle in the first episode. While the show strayed in many ways, the comics definitely provide a different layer of pain and are definitely recommended reading once the new print runs are out.


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Was It Agatha All Along on WandaVision? It Almost Wasn’t

Illustration for article titled Was It Agatha All Along on WandaVision? It Almost Wasn't

Screenshot: Disney+

Who’s been messing up everything? It was almost someone else.

That’s what WandaVision creator Jac Schaeffer said in an interview with Entertainment Tonight. At the very least, it wasn’t going to be Agatha all along after all. Turns out, at least initially, the relationship between Wanda and Agnes/Agatha Harkness (Kathryn Hahn) was more in line with the way it appears in the comics.

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“In the early stages, she functioned as more of a mentor, and then as we got into the room and started really legitimately breaking the episodes, it became clear that having more of a proper antagonist would serve the structure really well, so she increasingly moved in that direction,” Schaeffer said. “But we didn’t lose sight of the potential for her to be a mentor and a teacher and a partner and a confidant. All of that still infused all of their scenes together. And we like to say that there’s a version of the story where Wanda and Agatha walk off into the sunset together, you know? You could kind of see it, and I think that led to better writing for the two of them, those gray tones in there.”

As we see in the end, the story might not be over for Agatha and Wanda. That sunset walk could still be in store, and I’m more than fine with that. As Schaeffer told ET, the two are very similar—with one major difference.

“Well, and they’re both good and bad,” Schaeffer said. “They’re both light and dark. It’s all a spectrum. I don’t know. I feel like it all comes down to intention. All the things that Agatha says, she’s speaking truth. She’s telling Wanda what she needs to hear, but Agatha’s agenda is ultimately pretty selfish.”

The two are a glorious pair and I would not be be mad about a Falcon and Winter Soldier antagonistic buddy plotline for these two down the line. The two could use a pal.


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WandaVision Transforms Back Into Its Comic Book Roots in This Bewitching Art

Vadim Dvoeglazov’s takes on WandaVision’s first three episode.

Vadim Dvoeglazov’s takes on WandaVision’s first three episode.
Image: Vadim Dvoeglazov

You can always tell when a new series like Marvel’s WandaVision is a hit with audiences when the fandom starts creating its own impressive works of art that draw creative inspiration from the topic at hand. Illustrator Vadim Dvoeglazov’s no stranger to putting channeling his love for live-action fiction into stylized art meant to evoke the feeling of vintage comics, but when it came to getting in on the WandaVision hype, he wanted to bring something a bit different to his new series.

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For the past few weeks, as Disney+’s WandaVision built to its polarizing finale, Dvoeglazov’s been turning each of the series’ episodes into a different illustration that transforms that chapter of Wanda and Vision’s story into increasingly disturbing comic book covers. When we reached out to Dvoeglazov by e-mail to chat about his WandaVision series, he explained how his past work focused on The Mandalorian made his latest work a no-brainer.

But after seeing how WandaVision intended to consistently play with its style and tone from episode to episode, Dvoeglazov scrapped his initial plan to make a single piece of art based on the show, and instead decided to chronicle the entire season.

“I was very impressed by the format of the show, which was not previously seen in projects from Marvel, that very attracting mystery and unique energy that grows with each episode, a lot of Easter eggs and interesting details made this show alluring for me from the first episode,” Dvoeglazov told io9. “As trite as it sounds, perhaps these are the main motivators. Projects which I’m partial to inspire me equally, whether it’s the adventure story of a Mandalorian and a Child, or the story of a witch from Sokovia shrouded in alluring mystery.”

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Vadim Dvoeglazov’s illustrations inspired by WandaVision’s fourth, fifth, and sixth episodes.
Image: Vadim Dvoeglazov

For each illustration, Dvoeglazov wanted to convey how the series’ episodes hit him while also recreating images from the show that both captured the era-specific settings and fit his own choice of vintage aesthetics. Unreliable as theories can be, those also became part of Dvoeglazov’s creative process.

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“To be honest, everything happens in the head immediately during the first viewing of the series,” Dvoeglazov said. “I have several ideas and I try to choose the one that will maximally convey the very energy that I absorbed while watching, and at the same time I try to build the composition in such a way that it authentically conveys a recognizable vintage presentation, as in the classic Marvel comics about superheroes.”

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Though WandaVision’s come to an end, Dvoeglazov’s series is still a work-in-progress with two more covers inspired by the penultimate episode and season finale to come. He also sees this collection of covers as part of something bigger still.

“I confess that I plunged very deeply into this story, re-read many interesting theories, which, of course, further piques interest before the episodes are released,” Dvoeglazov continued. “WandaVision is one of the first key puzzles, which in the future, together with other paintings, will form one large-scale project, but I really don’t want this story to end on a sad note.”

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WandaVision is now streaming on Disney+.

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